DMC Stitch Contest Provokes Artists to Submit Subversive Designs

DMC, the embroidery floss, company, is running a contest that has cross stitch designers feeling stabby.

On April 16 we reported on DMC’s contest soliciting artists for designs to be published as free patterns on the DMC website. The winners would receive no financial compensation. Although in the past DMC has paid artists for designs, those collaborations were suddenly ended late last year and, according to the social media manager at DMC whom we spoke with for the April 16 article, the company’s current plan is to run unpaid contests to generate new patterns.

On the DMC website the artist doesn’t get a web link on his or her pattern’s page nor do they have a full profile, making it difficult to understand how even the promise of exposure as a prize could be meaningful.

The free patterns are used by DMC to sell embroidery floss. They are sent out weekly to DMC’s email list of 100,000 subscribers and each pattern is linked to a kit of DMC floss for consumers to purchase.

To enter the contest artists use the #dmcxstitchcontest hashtag on Instagram. At the beginning of the week, we began seeing subversive entries appear on the hashtag, and they’ve continued to flow in all week. Here are some of the highlights to date. DMC has yet to respond.

How to Become a Confident Negotiator: Expert Tips for Creative Business Owners

Negotiating a business relationship or contract on your own can be incredibly intimidating, especially if negotiation doesn’t come naturally for you. It didn’t come naturally to Katie Lane when she first started work as an attorney. She had to learn how to negotiate including how to help herself when she felt uncomfortable or intimidated.

Katie shares her expert tips for getting comfortable in your role as a negotiator when you own a creative business.

Best Practices for Vetting Craft Instructors

In the absence of a national platform for assessing craft teachers and class experience, show owners and event organizers are on their own for vetting instructors. Some best practices are emerging, especially as students’ expectations rise and professional teachers raise standards.

Pin It on Pinterest